Canary Library

  • White Paper

    Locational Marginal Emissions: A Force Multiplier for the Carbon Impact of Clean Energy Programs

    Purchasing renewable energy is a means to an end: decarbonization. Yet, renewable energy projects are not all equal when it comes to cutting carbon. REsurety has developed a new carbon impact measurement tool called Locational Marginal Emissions (LMEs) that measures carbon emission reductions at the granular level: the electrical node where energy is injected into the grid. Download the white paper to learn more.

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  • White Paper

    Project Drawdown: Climate Solutions at Work

    Climate Solutions at Work, presented by Drawdown Labs, is a how-to guide for employees looking to make every job a climate job.

    The all-encompassing climate crisis demands an equally expansive system of solutions, calling on everyone, everywhere to find their inroad—especially in the workplace.

    Employees are the backbone of a company’s ability to function, innovate, and survive through uncertain times. Even for the most passionate climate advocates, it can be hard to know how to accelerate action in the workplace and where to begin. This easy-to-browse guide explores creative ways to bring the world’s best private-sector climate solutions to life.

    Climate Solutions at Work is a new north star for employees looking to help shift companies beyond net zero.

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  • White Paper

    Equity in the energy transition: Who pays and who benefits?

    The transition to clean energy can help mitigate climate change and bring extensive social, health and well-being benefits to all Europeans. This process, however, is not without costs, particularly in the short term. With millions of people living in energy poverty in Europe, policymakers must ensure that these costs, as well as the benefits, are shared fairly among energy consumers.

    By unpacking the market, regulatory and policy decisions that determine how costs are passed on through consumer bills, the authors of this report aim to demystify the distributional aspects and impacts on the energy poor. It is critical that the clean energy transition does not require greater expenditure from energy consumers affected by energy poverty.

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  • White Paper

    How to Retire Early: Making Accelerated Coal Phaseout Feasible and Just

    As the urgency of the climate crisis grows, new analysis reveals that coal is no longer the cheapest way to power the global economy. The cost of clean energy has fallen so far that new renewables are now cheaper than new coal plants virtually everywhere, and there are specific financial strategies that utilities and policymakers can use to engineer a faster phaseout of coal in various regions of the world.

    This report lays out options for governments and public finance institutions to accelerate coal phase-out via an integrated three-part approach: refinancing to fund the coal transition and save customers money on day one; reinvesting in clean energy; and providing transition financing for workers and communities.

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  • White Paper

    Addressing an Electrification Roadblock: Residential Electric Panel Capacity

    Pecan Street’s new analysis explores the opportunities for policymakers and utilities to remove a significant barrier to residential electrification. By incentivizing electric service panel upgrades for existing homes and requiring larger capacity panels for new construction, we can clear the path for full residential electrification. This is also a critical opportunity to ensure a just energy transition by creating sliding incentives based on household income levels.

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  • White Paper

    Participating in Power: How to Read and Respond to Integrated Resource Plans

    To address climate and equity challenges, utilities will have to transform the way they plan – ensuring that a full range of resources are considered to meet utility customers’ needs. This should include both supply- and demand-side options, as well as distributed energy resources.

    One of the most important opportunities to advocate for such outcomes is via integrated resource plans, or IRPs, which regulated utilities submit to their public utility commission. PUC processes need public input, but participation has historically been limited because of the technical and legal expertise required. Participating in Power, the product of a collaboration between RAP and the Institute for Market Transformation, aims to address that barrier.

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  • White Paper

    The Race and Energy Nexus

    Our entire country is engaged in a broad and long-overdue examination of the roles that race and racism play in our society – our legal system, workforce, communities, politics, schools and more. Race also plays a role in energy – who has access to it, how much they pay for it, who works in the energy industry, who lives near our power plants, and who has a seat at the table to determine energy choices that town, city, state and federal governments make on our behalf.

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  • White Paper

    The New Economics of Electrifying Buildings: An Analysis of Seven Cities

    As states and cities across the United States work to cut carbon emissions from every sector, they’re starting to tackle a crucial transition: eliminating fossil fuels in buildings. Burning fossil fuels, primarily gas, to heat space and water and cook food poses a risk to climate goals and public health. Thus, spurring the shift to modern, electric appliances like heat pumps becomes critical.

    To help inform these decisions, we are expanding and improving upon our previous economic analysis to give a full picture of the cost of all-electric housing, starting with new, single-family homes in seven U.S. cities. 

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